Social Justice Education w/ Dan Scratch – TG²Cast Episode 9

This episode features an interview with Dan Scratch, high school social studies teacher, author of the website Teaching for Equity and Social Justice, and advocate of teaching for social justice. Topics include: Why it is important for students to engage in social justice Building relationships as a foundation for social justice How social justice impacts … Continue reading Social Justice Education w/ Dan Scratch – TG²Cast Episode 9

How to Build Castles in the Air

Hilda: My lovely, lovely castle. Our castle in the air! Solness: On a firm foundation. One of the more profound ironies of “going gradeless” is realizing just how fundamental grades are to the architecture of schools. Grades undergird nearly everything we do in education. By threatening late penalties and administering one-shot assessments, we focus our … Continue reading How to Build Castles in the Air

Getting Stuck on Self-Care: Why Community Care is Important for Educators

“Social security and public education are based on an extremely dangerous principle, namely that you care about other people.” Noam Chomsky “The author and intellectual Cornel West has said that ‘justice is what love looks like in public.’ I often think that neoliberalism is what lovelessness looks like as policy.” Naomi Klein Finding ways to save … Continue reading Getting Stuck on Self-Care: Why Community Care is Important for Educators

Equity in the Gradeless Classroom Roundtable

Does going gradeless automatically guarantee an equitable classroom? Could gradelessness produce inequitable outcomes? Can privilege, bias, and oppression still find its way into my teaching practice, regardless of my best intentions? I, for one, am thankful to have had gradeless educators pushing my thinking about these questions, helping me move from naive optimism to a … Continue reading Equity in the Gradeless Classroom Roundtable

The Grade Divide

Take a moment to think about the purpose of grades. What comes to mind? Historically speaking, grades were verbal reports from the teacher to parents about what students knew and could do, as well as areas in which they could improve (Brookhardt et al). Percentages and letter grades entered the academic scene in the early 20th century, … Continue reading The Grade Divide